Jealous Bones

I made a comment recently that,  no other person is a threat to us unless its violence.

Your husband’s secretary, the cute girl working behind the reception counter at the gym, the hot lady dancing near your husband on the dance floor and giving him the eye of interest, a co-worker and so on. jealousy wine glasses

It seems that many women (and men) have moderate to high levels of jealousy  regarding their spouses/partners.

 

 

Here are a few examples of the thinking patterns that supports jealous thoughts and feelings.

Faulty thinking: If my partner finds another attractive, then my relationship is at risk, as ‘they’ may ‘steal’ them from me.  all others are a risk to my relationship security.

Fantasy thinking: My partner will never find anyone  more attractive than me, I will be his/her end all be all. He/she will never have interest in being with another sexually because they are completely fulfilled, aroused and satisfied that I am the best lover.

Fear, Self-Loathing thinking: Oh look, she is prettier than I, I am ugly/fat, of course my partner will want another, I know he’ll leave me for her. I hate her.

Wise thinking: If my partner finds another attractive, he/she is appreciating the beauty in another.  I feel secure in myself and in my relationship. If evidence comes up that  my partner crosses physical boundaries with this individual, then we will address it at that time.  Being human, we will find others attractive and have sexual interest in them, in my relationship we recognize this and work to maintain our monogamy. If our monogamy is challenged, I have many choices as to how to handle the situation.

jealous clipJealousy comes from fear, a loss of control, a belief that you are not good enough.

It is a faulty logic that is superceding our rational mind and higher sense of self. When we engage in faulty logic we increase our anxieties, feel scared and lessen our own sense of worth.

Dr Helen Fisher explains jealousy in an article for O magazine,

“Why do we feel jealousy? Therapists often regard the demon as a scar of childhood trauma or a symptom of a psychological problem. And it’s true that people who feel inadequate, insecure, or overly dependent tend to be more jealous than others. But the “monster” actually evolved for positive reasons. Throughout our primordial past it discouraged desertion by a mate, bolstering the family unit and enabling the survival of the young. At the same time, it has pushed us to abandon philanderers—and many a futile match—in favor of more stable and rewarding partnerships. Jealousy can even be good for love. One partner may feel secretly flattered when the other is mildly jealous. And catching someone flirting with your beloved can spark the kind of lust and romance that reignites a relationship.”

“But jealousy can go seriously awry. Some people, for no apparent reason, become consumed by it, undermining their self-esteem, and even driving their partner into another’s arms—the very outcome they had feared.”             Read more: http://www.oprah.com/relationships/Understanding-Jealousy-Helen-Fisher-PhD-on-Relationships#ixzz2vmqoA8vx

One can utilize their feelings of jealousy in a positive way, to explore what is promoting their jealous feelings and get to the root of the concern.  It may allow you to shift from fearful thinking into wise thinking, or it may be a neon sign letting you know that a big problem resides in your relationship.

No one is a threat to our relationship, if our partner steps out emotionally and/or physically, it is not because of the other person, it IS because of your partners choice.

Remind yourself of your worth and value, shift into healthy-wise thinking, support a relationship that has boundaries in which you feel comfortable.  When a problem arrives address it, until then, don’t let your Jealous Bones create havoc in a likely unnecessary situation.

 

A quote by Robert A Heinlein, provides insight into the opposing factors of jealousy and love.  “Jealousy is a disease, love is a healthy condition. The immature mind often mistakes one for the other, or assumes that the greater the love, the greater the jealousy – in fact, they are almost incompatible; one emotion hardly leaves room for the other.”
Robert A. Heinlein, Stranger in a Strange Land

 

 

 

 

About Anton Therapy

As a psychotherapist specializing in sexual concerns, I believe that communication and compromise, with a playful and open attitude are key components to a healthy intimate life. I infuse compassion, enthusiasm and a collaborative approach in treatment that puts clients at ease in discussing such personal topics. I hope this blog helps to open your mind, promote healthy sex, and encourages you to have a desire for intimacy and life! View all posts by Anton Therapy

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